New book: Uprisings in Eighteenth-Century Britain: Mediation & the Transformation of Political Culture

My monograph on uprisings in eighteenth-century Britain has been published by Bloomsbury Academic in the “Cultures of Early Modern Europe” series. The book examines how the British Empire contained revolution by integrating opposition agents as new spaces of power opened up.

soldiers marching through London

The Gordon Riots by John Seymour Lucas, artgallery.nsw.gov.au, Public Domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Publisher’s Description

Monika Barget convincingly argues that this process of constitutionalisation meant that groups from the aristocracy to the church, from the army to the people at large, were brought into the system in a way that negated the obvious, serious challenges that were posed to the Empire by the Glorious Revolution, the Jacobite Rebellion, the American Revolution, and Jacobin threats of the late 18th century. Barget goes on to highlight the lasting political and legal repercussions of this process. The structure of the chapters, each focussing on specific agents and conflict media, also links the history of political agency and political institutions with an expanding European and even trans-continental media market.

Table of Contents

Introduction
1. Agency through Communication: Media Genres and Terminologies
2. Monarchs and Aristocrats: The Constitutionalisation of Leadership and the Dialogisation of Government Communication
3. Parliament, Parties and Politicians: Conflict Negotiation through Representation
4. Religious Communities and Religious Leaders: Inclusive and Divisive Potentials of Faith after the Glorious Revolution
5. Regular Troops, Militia and Armed Civilians: Military and Paramilitary Agency as Vehicles of Identity and Integration
6. The People, the Mob and the Re-Evaluation of Public Opinion
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search