Conference paper “The power of media in visualizing the Dutch Revolt”

M.F.D. Marianne Eekhout (University of Leiden) is an another expert in Dutch history whom we are happy to welcome at our conference on visual depictions of revolt and punishment in early modern times.

Marianne works on local memory culture in the Netherlands. Her major interests are the commemoration of the Dutch Revolt, material culture, images and objects as part of local memory practice in the Low countries.

Dutch print_city massacre_detail

During the Dutch Revolt different media were used to visualize the war. Prints by Frans Hogenberg rapidly spread the news about new episodes to the population. But besides these well-known depictions there are several other visual media in which the Dutch Revolt circulated throughout the Netherlands. Paintings, plaques, roundels and silver were common media to translate a message about what happened during the Revolt to an (elite) audience. This could be a joyous message about a victory, but also an attempt to deal with a certain loss or act of violence. In both cases, however, the selected medium had an impact on how the message was brought across. How media visualized the Revolt, which topics were common, and who were involved in and used certain media during the late sixteenth and seventeenth century is the subject of this paper.

Dutch print public beheading_detail


Monika Barget

Monika Barget studied history, history of art and theology in Augsburg (Germany) and Galway (Ireland). In 2013, she joined the international research group 'Early Modern Revolts' at Konstanz University as a doctoral student. Since October 2017, she has been project manager in the Letters 1916-1923 project at Maynooth University (Ireland). Her research interests include early modern constitutional history and political iconography.

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.